Quinoa pasta {vegan, gluten-free}

Quinoa Pasta - A pinch of meLast year I got a pasta machine for Christmas. I’m ashamed to admit that it was still in its box until now.

When I was 8 or 9 my father lived in Rotterdam. Every other weekend I went to visit him. My father didn’t have any other friends with kids, so we didn’t do the typical kids stuff. Sure we went to the zoo, but also to museums, the opera, and all those things you appreciate now, but as a kid probably not as much as I should have. And on Sunday we cooked: our own curries, bread and also pasta from scratch. I must say, where making your own pasta seemed like a day task when I was a kid, it’s a lot easier now as an adult!

To try out my pasta machine, I immediately went for an experiment: a gluten-free, vegan pasta.

To replace the eggs, I used chia seeds with water. I guess you can grind the seeds first, if you want a smoother result. I was lazy so I just used them without grinding, the result is more or less the same.

Quinoa Pasta - A pinch of meQuinoa Pasta - A pinch of me

  • 2 cups of quinoa flour
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds with 6 tbsp hot water, soaked and stirred until a paste forms
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup warm water

Quinoa Pasta - A pinch of meQuinoa Pasta - A pinch of me

How to:

  • Make a well with your dry ingredients.
  • Pour the oil, the chia seed mixture and some of the water into the well and start to incorporate some of the flour into the liquid, being careful not to break “the well wall”.
  • Gradually add more water as needed to moisten all the flour.  It will seem like you don’t have enough water, but this dough should not be sticky or soft.  You will have to use your hands to knead the dough and have it start to stick together.  It will be kind of dry compared to other doughs.
  • Let it rest by wrapping in plastic wrap and sitting it on the counter for about 20 minutes.
  • Divide the dough in quarters and roll out with a rolling pin thin enough to feed into the pasta machine on its largest setting.  There will be lots of cracks and uneven edges; that’s okay.
  • Take the first rollout and fold over in thirds or half.  Turn 90 degrees and feed into the roller again.  Do this a few times, adjust the thickness level one level thinner and repeat until you have the desired thickness you want.
  • Once you’ve got your dough the thickness and texture you want, you can then cut into noodles, lasagna sheets, stamp into ravioli, etc.
  • Boil for maximum 3 minutes.

Quinoa Pasta - A pinch of meQuinoa Pasta - A pinch of meQuinoa Pasta - A pinch of me

All pictures by Stijn van Minnebruggen.

This entry was posted in gluten-free, main courses, recipes, vegan, vegetarian. Bookmark the permalink.

74 Responses to Quinoa pasta {vegan, gluten-free}

  1. jen says:

    Why is this called Quinoa Pasta when it’s actually made with chickpeas and not quinoa?

    • pinchofme says:

      Hi,
      I have changed it to quinoa. I planned on making it with chickpea flour but changed last minute.
      I’m sure you can make it with both.

    • Penny says:

      I look forward to making this quinoa pasta today. Thanks for sharing the recipe and inspiration. The photos are just amazing! Penny

      • cindy says:

        what if you dont have a pasta roller would a rolling pin be sufficient then cut with a knife to make the noodles

      • pinchofme says:

        Hi,
        I’m sure that can work. Just make sure you roll them thin enough, otherwise the taste will be a bot too doughy.
        Good luck!

  2. Caitlin says:

    i’m really interested in trying your recipe! i have a few questions- why is it called quinoa pasta but no quinoa in the ingredients? am i just not seeing it somewhere? also, do you think i could replace the chia seeds with flaxseed meal and water? this looks spectacular!

  3. afracooking says:

    I love the idea of making pasta with other flours than wheat. I will ty both with quinoa as with chickpea flour. Reading the above comments I gather that the recipe used to read “chickpea flour” (at least I did not find the chickpeas mentioned anymore). I am curious: have you tried it with quinoa or did you just change the recipe. The pictures – are they quinoa or chickpea?

    • pinchofme says:

      Hi,
      I’m so sorry for the mix-up. The photo’s are with quinoa flour.
      But you can try both, I’m sur with chickpea flour it will taste great as well.

      • afracooking says:

        Hey there, No apology needed!!!And thanks for responding! I was just curious! I will definately give this recipe a try!

  4. Katie says:

    If I would put quinoa into my food processor, and run it until it’s a powdery texture, would that be considered quinoa flour?

  5. Deborah Herman says:

    I’ve always enjoyed making fresh pasta. I can’t wait to try this one both ways.

  6. Ayra says:

    So glad I found this recipe! I have a whole bag of quinoa just begging to be used!
    Thank you!

  7. So thankful that I found your blog through Pinterest. Made this pasta last night with flax meal and it turned out deliciously – thanks for sharing. We used the noodles as a base for chicken alfredo. Love the photos, look of your blog, and your written ‘voice'; quite authentic. I’m looking forward to more of your posts!

  8. Marie says:

    I have always wanted to try making pasta and I recently discovered I really like quinoa.Looking forward to trying your recipes! And I concur with A.P. above…..glad I found your blog PinchofMe :)

    Nice to “meet” you both!

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  11. Sophie33 says:

    What a creative & tasty home-made pasta!! Waw! I am so going to make this stunning pasta with my own pasta machine! yeah!!

  12. AllergicAnnie says:

    Hi, this looks like a great recipe! I’ve had boxed quinoa pasta, and I’ve noticed that it falls apart while cooking. Did these noodles fall apart at all? Thanks!

  13. This looks like a great recipe! I’ve eaten boxed quinoa pasta and it seems to fall apart while cooking. Did you notice these noodles falling apart at all? Thanks!

  14. Edwin McGee says:

    Thank you so much for this recipe. A couple of questions: If I wanted to use eggs instead of the chia seeds, how many eggs would this take? Can the pasta be frozen? How long would it last in the refrigerator?

    Thanks.

    Ed

    • pinchofme says:

      Hi,
      Most fresh pasta recipes don’t use eggs, so you can make it with or without. To keep the same consistency I would suggest replacing the chia seeds with two eggs.
      I have never tried freezing the pasta, but I guess it’s possible. In the refrigerator I would keep it for a maximum of 2 days. Keep in mind that it will dry a bit, so it will break a bit faster.

      Good luck!

    • Marleena A says:

      I freeze fresh pasta all the time as did my mother. Just allow a few extra minutes for it to cook when go to cook it.

      • terrys529 says:

        Actually, traditional Italians do make pasta with eggs. The ratio is one egg and one cup of flour for every person eating. Then you add just enough water to reach the consistency you need for kneading. :)

  15. Sonny_Chia says:

    Mine has been in the box for two years but this recipe has inspired me to take it out and use it.

  16. krystal says:

    If I wanted to use eggs instead of the chia seeds how many eggs would I use? Tks!

  17. Marya says:

    Have you tried it again with ground chia seeds?

  18. diamond says:

    This is so wonderful….i’ve been on the search for a pasta brand that only uses quinoa flour as I don’t have the time to make pasta everyday ( would be nice though). Do you know of a pasta brand that only use quinoa flour?. All the brands I’ve found incorporate wheat, rice or corn.Thanks for the recipe.

  19. gene says:

    Hi, We are in the Moringa Business: http://www.MoringaSpirit.com. and are very into healthy living. We are trying to develope a healthy pasta using Moringa powder and Quinoa flour. I really like your blog, photos,etc. Do you think this pasta can be dried and sold and packaged like other pastas? Any help and suggestions greatly appreciated! Maybe you would like working with us to bring this to the marketplace! Gene at Moringa Spirit.

    • pinchofme says:

      Hi,

      Since you don’t really use ingredients with a fast experience date I guess you can package it.
      But it’s fragile, so I’m not sure how you can keep it looking good.
      Sorry no big help, but I really have no idea…

      best

      • Thanks for your quick response to my comments. I guess the bottom line is experiment! Any suggestions from your readers with tips or ideas will be really appreciated! Thanks.

  20. Suzan says:

    How many servings did this make?

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  22. I’m making pasta for the very first time and am trying this recipe because I had some wonderful quinoa pasta at a restaurant recently. I just rolled out the first 1/4 and ran it through the skinny cutter (spaghetti) then cooked it just to see if I was on the right track. It ended up about the consistency of top ramen. It tasted wonderful as I toasted my quinoa then milled it myself so the flavor was very rich but the texture wasn’t good. Do you think I just over cooked it? I think I left it in for 4 minutes but I’m wondering if I should have done it much shorter because of the noodle size. Thoughts? Should it have more al dente texture or is it a mushier pasta?

    • pinchofme says:

      I would suggest to only cook it for 2 minutes or so.
      Fresh pasta is ready very quickly…

      • Thanks for replying! I made the rest of the dough using the linguini roller and it turned out a bit better. It really does cook super fast.

        Just FYI, in case anyone else is wondering, one CAN use a dehydrator to dry these. I don’t know how long they’ll keep but I have small children so hanging pasta everywhere was NOT an option. Last night I put them on the dehydrator racks but it got too late so I didn’t start it up until this morning (at least the pasta was safely contained). This morning I put the dehydrator on the lowest setting for a couple of hours and I have a nice pile of dried quinoa pasta now. To test it, I just cooked some for 3 minutes and although it was still a little overdone, it was certainly quite tasty. I’ll just cook it for 2 minutes next time. Apparently I like my pasta quite al dente.

        Thank you for your wonderful tutorial! I made some regular pasta with my 5 year old this morning and was thrilled to find that your descriptions of how thick/not sticky the dough should be were right on. It is quite a bit easier making pasta with regular flour and a fresh backyard egg but I’m going to continue to experiment with other flours and flax or chia to see which vegan variety I like best for myself.

  23. Makeda says:

    Thanks for this recipe! I love quinoa and was wondering how to make quinoa pasta since most add corn which I do not tolerate well. I was wondering about making your version and drying it for later use. I will experiment with sprouted quinoa flour and drying it in the dehydrator and hope it turns out well. Thanks again! :)

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  25. Liza says:

    We recently found out my son is allergic to eggs and wheat. I am so excited I ran across this recipe! I can’t wait to try it.

    I little info about how we stored noodles…I am Italian and my entire family makes pasta (every Saturday as a child we made pasta). My grandmother and mom used to lay the pasta on the table to dry, later when they were dry we carefully transfered them to a box with a lid and stored them in a cool dry place. My mom stores hers in the basement. The noodles keep a long time.

  26. kzettler63 says:

    Hi, I found your recipe off of pinterest. I am allergic to eggs, chia seeds, flax seeds, gluten, corn, rice, oats, safflour, buckwheat, chicken, turkey, a bunch of fruits and some veggies and certain spices, just to name a few, yeah the list does go on and on…I’m in over my head trying to get my diet under control with all I can’t eat. I thought I was doing well giving up gluten, dairy, eggs, nuts, peanuts, chia seeds last year that I noticed bothered me, until I hived up this spring. The doc said we should run extensive allergy tests and now I’m in over my head. What I thought were safe foods for me, are now my enemies too. What I’m getting at is what else can I use as a glue for making pasta? I miss pasta, I was happy when I found rice and corn pasta. Now I can’t have those either. I got so depressed at the whole food store and trader joe’s trying to find some new stuff I could have or use to make meals. I almost wish I didn’t know the truth. Thanks for listening. Karen

    • pinchofme says:

      Hi Karen,
      That’s a whole list of things you can not eat…
      I used the chia seeds as glue but someone commented here that you can leave them out.
      So just use water and that’s it.
      I’m guessing it will be a bit more difficult to kneed everything, but maybe you can try it?
      Best of luck,
      Steffi

    • Mary says:

      What about using a nut flour such as almond or hazelnut? I have a TON of allergies also (thought I was reading my list up there! TG is next week and I often wonder what’s the point? I can’t have the turkey, cranberries or stuffing)

      • pinchofme says:

        Hi,
        I haven’t really used nut flours, but maybe you can chickpea flour? I’m sure you can use them all, you will just have to adapt the liquids because some of them absorp more.
        Good luck!

      • kzettler63 says:

        I’m sorry you are going thru similar amount of allergies as I am. It sucks, I’ve had allergies off and on all my life. This is the worst it has ever been. Think of Thanksgiving as being more with friends and family then about the food. I’m fixing a ham since I can’t have turkey, hubby is fine with it.

      • pinchofme says:

        I hope you will feel better soon!
        And I’m not really familiar with Thanksgiving (I’m from Belgium) but I’m sure people will appreciate your company more than the turkey!

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  28. Jessica says:

    How many portions did this recipe yield

  29. judah10 says:

    can anyone tell me where I can boy quinoa Lasagna pasta?? I have looked for ever.. I can find fusilli .. macarronni..speghitti.. spegatinni.. but not Lasagne

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  31. clems says:

    I’m going to try & make homemade ravioli with the quinoa pasta. Do you think they’ll hold up? Thanks :)

  32. Liane says:

    These looked so amazing, so I´m sorry to say they did not work. At all. I followed the recipe exactly, but when I put the dough the pasta machine it just broke and didn´t hold together. I added a bit more oil and water, but it still broke. Wrapped it in plastic wrap, waited, tried again. No luck. I´ll probably try and make this into some sort of bread. Do you know what could´ve gone wrong?

    • pinchofme says:

      Hi,
      I would suggest using some more chia seeds and water.
      In non-vegan pasta it’s the eggs that keep everything together.
      Or grind the chia seeds before using them, that way you get a more gel like structure.

  33. Greetings from down by Breda… So going to try this! I am starting to really get into trying out all sorts of wheat flour subs as I don’t do terribly well with gluten. I don’t have a tremendous amount of experience with chia seeds though. Do you think that it might work using flaxseeds (lijnzaden)? I have LOADS of that.
    Which do you think tastes better? The beaniness of the chickpea flour or the sometimes aftertaste of the quinoa flour?

    • pinchofme says:

      I think you can use flaxseeds, I’m just not sure about the quantity, so it’s trial and error there.
      I would suggest using the same amount as with the chia seeds and adding more if needed.
      Personally I’m more a fan of the chickpea flour, but that’s more to the fact I don’t really like the smell of quinoa flour.

      • Thanks for the reply. I will try and see with the flax seeds and see how it goes.. and try it with both flours. I totally agree on the smell of the quinoa flour. I use chickpea flour much more often.

  34. Jane says:

    Just made my first batch and when I ran it through my pasta maker, the pasta didn’t stay in nice long pasta like in your picture. It kept breaking so I have lots of little short noodles? Help what did I do wrong?

    • pinchofme says:

      Difficult to say, but to me it sounds as the consistency was not completely right.
      I would suggest using a bit more chia seeds and water to make it more doughy.
      I hope this helps.

  35. Katie V says:

    Sorry to be a pain but can I dry the pasta out and use another day or does it have to cooked straight away?

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